New Course: Introduction to Rooting and Stability

If you listed to the recent Qigong Radio episode on Rooting, Central Equilibrium, and Balance, you probably want more insight into how to put Tai Chi balance training to work in your practice. Now you can start Tai Chi balance training with our new eBook, “An Introduction to Rooting and Stability,” where you will take […]

The Connection Between Rooting and Strength in Tai Chi

In a recent post, we looked at 5 Ways to Build Strong Legs. When I posted the video to Youtube, someone replied: I think nowadays there is a great misunderstanding of internal martial arts goals and methodology. The great issue is not to become strong but to become very weak! Now, I think the commenter […]

The Essential Elements of Tai Chi Balance Training

In this episode of Qigong Radio, Don Miller and I explore the essential elements of Tai Chi Balance Training. As you probably know, Tai Chi is being used more and more for falls prevention programs for the elderly and becoming a mainstream part of the Western medical vocabulary. But what are the actual elements that […]

Obviously Tai Chi Improves Balance, But How Do You Explain It?

We often talk about the way Tai Chi can improve your physical health and mental and emotional well-being from the point of view of the practitioner. But not everyone out there is as familiar with practical ways to use Tai Chi to support their health and wellness goals as you may be. Later this year, […]

5 Ways to Build Stronger Legs Using Tai Chi Exercises

As Tai Chi Master Cheng Man Ching is famous for saying, “Tai Chi Chuan, the great ultimate, strengthens the weak, raises the sick, invigorates the debilitated, and encourages the timid.” I believe that many of these benefits come from building stronger legs. Not only do these exercises solve the obvious physical problems that come from […]

Update on Quantity vs. Quality and the Struggle for Perfect Practice

A few months ago we talked about the signs of progress in your qigong practice. For so many of us, the issue of “progress” is central to qigong or Tai Chi practice, since we are driven by the desire to get it right, to solve a problem like a health issue, or to reach an […]

The 8 Active Ingredients of Tai Chi

In his new book, the Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi, Dr. Peter Wayne lays out the “8 Active Ingredients of Tai Chi” to help us understand the interface between traditional Tai Chi practice and the Western biomedical paradigm. As the Research Director of the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, jointly based at Brigham […]

Avoid Bad Tai Chi Posture

Tai Chi has the potential to solve many common posture-related problems, but only if you follow the correct Tai Chi principles. Specifically, you want to pay attention to the body alignments that unify the arms, legs, and spine, creating effortless openness throughout the skeletal system. In Tai Chi, the way you hold your neck and […]

Practice Rhythms at Tai Chi Immersion Week

Here is my mid-week update from Tai Chi Immersion Week 2013 at Brookline Tai Chi. It’s pretty cool to see folks come from all over to train for a week, but you really have to have the right mind set to make the most of the format. See what I mean here: When you practice, […]

“Song” or Relaxation in Tai Chi

The meaning of relaxation in a Tai Chi context is often confused with the same kind of limp, collapsed, let-go feeling you get from flopping on to the couch after a long day. In fact, there’s a very different sense of “song” or relaxation in Tai Chi, which is at once easy and loose, but […]